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Using ‘I can…’ statements

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During my Phase 2 practice, I implemented ‘I Can’ statements which enables pupils to reflect on what they have learnt so far, as well as providing as an assessment tool. The template was given to the children at the beginning of the topic and we would tick off what we have done so far. It was a good way to look back and reflect on when children were absent and what they have missed. This could then be implemented into future planning. I got the idea from observing the year 6 teacher’s Science lesson so I asked for support with regard to planning the templates and how to implement them within the classroom. This was a beneficial tool for me but I question the effectiveness for the children. Although it allows them to see their own progress, some children were ticking things dishonestly and inaccurately. For example, a child ticked every box on the first lesson. This was a critical incident for me – as it taught me that I must model how to use checklists to prevent this from happening again. This is something that I will always remember.

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Devising a seating plan

During my placement, I created a setting plan. The plan was based on mixed ability to enable the boys to support one and other. The plan had to be carefully worked out to ensure that the boys will work well together. Additional needs also had to be considered such as those who needed support, the child with dyslexia and the children with glasses. I am glad to have been able to experience designing and implementing a new seating plan so that I know what to do come September!

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Teaching PE

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When I was asked to teach PE, I was hit with nerves and excitement! Teaching PE to a class of year 4, sporty boys was nerve-wrecking. However, after meeting with the Sports Teacher, he devised a plan for me to follow and went through the lesson. I felt much better and couldn’t wait to get stuck in. The lesson went well overall and I used mixed ability as a form of differentiation and support. Some of the children played tennis professionally so it wouldn’t have been fair to pair all of them together. I learnt that when teaching PE, modelling is KEY. For example, I had to demonstrate the ‘shake hands’ motion for when holding a bat. Through reflecting on this, and as evident in my evaluation, it was quite tricky to project my voice over 30 excited boys and a hall. So, it is important to always have a whistle!! It was also quite hard to cram everything in in the space of 30 minutes so I definitely think an hour would have been more beneficial. Despite this, my confidence has definitely developed when teaching PE and I cant wait to teach it again as an NQT (with a whistle!). Also, during the lesson, a child cut his eye and had to go to first aid. I followed school policy and send him to the office to receive treatment and provided the parents with a ‘bump on the head’ letter.

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Cross Curricular Art & History

1 27 During my final practice, I collaborated with the Art Specialist teacher to plan two lessons based on the Stone Age. As we had been focusing on Stig of the Dump in English, I thought that it would be a fun way to combine English, History and Art into one!! The learning objective of the lesson was to create a cave painting (See image 2) from tissue paper, chalk and charcoal. I used tissue paper to give it a rough effect and we discussed the history behind using chalk and charcoal (they were the only tools around then!). We also looked at a few cave paintings and discussed what they used to paint Рmainly animals and humans hunting. However, it was important to make sure that I had the relevant subject knowledge to teach this effectively. Therefore, I visited BBC which contained a wide variety of activities and subject knowledge. I would definitely advise this to anybody who wants to teach art combined with History. If teaching this lesson again, I would make sure to explain that they need to draw their cave painting bigger. Although the child on image 2 did, some of the children drew quite small. Overall, I really enjoyed teaching this and the children produced some beautiful work!IMG_3087

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Hagrid’s Potion Prices!

During my final practice, the boys were OBSESSED with Harry Potter. So, I decided to implement a potion price list when teaching money. The children were really engaged with this and loved the idea of it having a real-life, comical context. I was also praised for this resource by the Year 5 teacher who was observing the other classroom. However, the HA resource contained a typing error and included a fraction that couldn’t be divided equally. This caused a bit of chaos and disruption so next time, it is so important to check home-made worksheets for any errors. Also, it is crucial to keep your subject knowledge up to date! Perhaps if I had done so, there wouldn’t have been an error. Nevertheless, the children were so engaged and motivated by the theme of the lesson that they all got on to complete the extension challenge cards.¬†These resources were effectively differentiated and I would definitely use them again (once I’ve corrected the typo that is!). I have attached the differentiated sheets.

Hagrid_s Potion Price List SquaresHagrid_s Potion Price List Triangles