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Reflecting on the effectiveness of lessons

During my final practice, I was advised by my personal tutor to use the school planning format to record my evaluations, rather than the Edge Hill one. This proved to be extremely time effective and more beneficial for me. It allowed me to scribble on my planning so that it became a working document. I could then refer back to my evaluations for the rest of that week and change my lessons accordingly. Personal children are also noted within my planning so that these can be targeted within the following lesson – if this was on Edge Hill format, I would have been flipping through pages and pages to find these key children. I also evaluated the use of resources, so that myself and the class teacher knew what could be improved next time. For example, the Maths evaluation states that Abacus was too challenging so next time, I would devise a worksheet more suited to their individual needs. In the future, I definitely aim to keep up evaluating on the planning and if this is not possible or doesn’t comply with school policy, then I will use post-it notes. I think quick, timely and accurate evaluations proved to be more effective than paragraph after paragraph

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Using Vocabulary Maps to support low attaining children in English

1 18During my final placement, I differentiated in many different ways. One of these ways were through resources. When engaging with writing, I would always ensure that the children had prompts on their tables, whether this was in the form of vocabulary maps, images or both. The children used the image above when writing a descriptive piece based on Narnia – what’s behind the door? After assessing their prior knowledge, I discovered that the low attaining children specifically struggled to use sentence openers and adverbs in their writing. Therefore, I implemented these into the vocabulary map for the children to use as prompts. This resource proved to be extremely beneficial for the low attaining children and the child who had Dyslexia. However, although it is a good starting point, you have to be mindful about children over-relying on the vocabulary and not thinking of any independently. Next time, I would only implement vocab banks during the planning process and encourage independence during the writing. This will enable me to assess more accurately.

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‘I Matter Code’

During my time in a specialised setting, I was provided with an ‘I Matter’ code which was the school’s safeguarding policy. It enabled those that aren’t familiar with SEN/D settings to gather an idea of what each child is entitled to. For example, choices. It also mentions ‘Give me time to respond’ as not all children will be communicative. This is where the rules differ from being in a mainstream school. Although you will give children time to respond, it will come much more naturally whereas in specialised settings, this right is explicit. It enables professionals to know how to keep children safe, whilst addressing a wide range of needs. For example, ‘always let me know what will happen next’ may be specifically important when teaching a child with autism who finds changes difficulty. However, a child with ADHD may not need to know what happens next. Therefore, although these needs are equally important, some children will require one more than others. This is a crucial policy to implement as people (like me) who had never been in a SEN/D school may overlook these basic needs so it is important to ensure that they know how to make each child feel safe.

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Literacy weekly plan – Phase 1A

1 8During my first placement, I decided to create a Literacy Weekly Plan. This is a form of short-term planning which enables the class teacher to plan the week overview.

Teachers’ Standards –
TS2 – The plan reflect upon children’s prior knowledge.

TS4 – The plan evidences effective use of lesson time as the plan separates starter, main and plenaries. I have also contributed to the design of the curriculum as the class teacher asked to keep my planning to use the following year. Questioning is evident to encourage assessment.

TS5 – Differentiation is evident within the planning. Different tasks are set for the different ability groups. The plan also evidences that I differentiated through resources, support and questioning.

TS6 – Assessment through questioning